The Table19 World Cup Roundup

By Tom Wood

In celebration of Russia 2018 we took some time to look back at some of the best campaigns we saw from across the world during the tournament and held our very own Table19 Ad World Cup.

Here’s our Remarkable winners from each category.


 

BEST USE OF ‘IT’S COMING HOME’

THE CATEGORY:

What started as a bit of fun on social media soon became a bit more of a reality as Tunisia, Panama, Colombia and Sweden all fell to the Three Lions. It’s Coming Home created a buzz around the country and people were getting behind England with memes, videos and of course playing the Euro 96 hit. The brand we felt best capitalised on the passion phenomenon over the summer was Marks and Spencer….

WHY IT’S REMARKABLE?

It’s the hottest summer since 1976 and thanks to Gareth Southgate men and women up and down the country started wearing waistcoats. As the official supplier of suits for the England team, M&S got a bit lucky, but they sure made it count as their waistcoat sales more than doubled during the world cup.

 

BEST NOT FOR PROFIT

THE CATEGORY:

The World Cup isn’t just about huge brands going toe to toe, there’s a chance for charities and smaller brands to get their voices heard. The charity we felt best did this was The National Centre for Domestic Violence…

WHY IT’S REMARKABLE?

Aside from the hard hitting, attention grabbing imagery, the campaign used a real insight of the rise of domestic abuse during major football tournaments to help a good cause get the awareness it deserves.

 

BEST REACTIVE CAMPAIGN

THE CATEGORY:

To be honest most of campaigns we saw were pretty reactive and the rise in digital and social channels made this world cup easy to react to individual moments during the tournament (and there were a lot). But our favourite reactive campaign came from KFC in South Africa…

WHY IT’S REMARKABLE?

Neymar’s antics during the World Cup sparked an internet sensation with people mimicking the Brazilian all over social media, but KFC went one further and created a whole ad campaign off the back that moment. It’s clever, it’s reactive, but above all else it’s a bit of fun.

 

BEST CONTROVERSIAL CAMPAIGN

THE CATEGORY:

Now this category lived up to its name and sparked a bit of debate. In the end we landed on which campaign would have the most positive impact on the brand, rather than what caused the most controversy (we’ll come onto that in a moment). The brand we felt created the best campaign that would cause a bit of controversy was Paddy Power…

 

 

WHY IT’S REMARKABLE?

We could have gone all polar bear here but decided that the campaign to use Russia’s success at the world cup to reward LGBT charities had a more positive impact. I’m not sure they knew just how well Russia would do but a simple mechanic helped give 2 fingers to homophobia.

 

MOST CONTROVERSIAL CAMPAIGN
THE CATEGORY:

Who created the most controversial campaign that it got pulled, forced an apology and probably had a negative impact on their brand? Burger King in Russia that’s who…

WHY IT’S NOT REMARKABLE?

Well, they’re using the enticement of $47,000 and free whoppers to life for any woman who falls pregnant to a world cup footballer during the world cup – says it all really!

 

 

5 things we can learn from The World Cup campaigns:

Be reactive (but plan ahead, you might get lucky)

The World Cup is all about moments in time, but you can plan for outcomes well in advance

 

You don’t need to be a sponsor

Nike have done it for years, but you don’t need to be an official sponsor to create a buzz

 

Football creates awareness for other causes

It’s not all about beer, boots and betting it’s a great opportunity to drive awareness for charitable causes

 

Going against the normal formula gets you noticed

You don’t need a huge budget, world cup stars and a cheesy soundtrack to make a noise

 

Your audience are broader than you think

Football is now watched by the most diverse audience ever, it’s a chance to talk to everyone – not just men

 

– Tom Wood, Account Director